Pocket it

My goal yesterday was to wear my coat to Knitsmiths.  That meant that I needed to finish the pocket linings.  So, how do you line a knitted pocket with corduroy?  Beats me!  For the life of me, I could not figure out how to line each side of the pocket so that both pieces of corduroy were attached to each other, the coat, and the pocket lining, and slit the corduroy so that it lined up with the pocket slit on the front of the coat.

A clever person probably could figure out a way to do that.  I, on the other hand, decided that the least complicated thing to do was to line only the back of the pocket (i.e. the part the peaks out from the slit).  I was also a little bit concerned that the line of the coat might be affected if I affixed some fabric to the front.  Because I didn't want to destroy the darned thingPocket_pin after so much time and energy, I decided to play safe, and to do what I knew would work.

First: pin knitted pieces to the fabric, and cut out the pocket linings.


Pocket_hem
Second:  cut out the fabric, unpin the knitted pockets,
and iron hems on the corduroy.


Sewing
Third:  attach hemmed fabric to knitted pocket.  Now, originally, I thought of pick stitching  the pieces together.  Ugh.  Then a wonderful alternative dawned on me.


"Aaaaiieeee!" you say, averting your eyes and running away from the computer.  "A sewing machine!? You attached something to a knitted garment with a sewing machine?  What were you thinking?" 

I was thinking that I didn't want to spend all day pick stitching those bleepin' pieces together.  This way, the seam was much stronger than anything that I could have done by hand and no one will see the seam.  Okay?

"I guess," you reply, as you gingerly retake your seat in front of the monitor.
Attached
Once the sewing bit was complete, all that remained was to attach the pocket pieces to the back of the coat.  That, I completed with some leftover yarn and my tapestry needles.

SlitResult: a little bit of red poking through the slit, and warm, soft pockets for my hands.  Thanks for the idea, William!


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